it's not always like you see it
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Satoshi Kudo - Charismatic portrait


In mid-July I had the pleasure of photographing a famous Satoshi Kudo.
Hi is a choreographer and a dancer. As a rehearsal director, he has been working for Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui since 2006 and has worked for Royal Swedish Ballet.
Kudo’s original theory is a “Motion Qualia” which is a movement theory based on simple physics. The body follows gravity with natural reflexes by brain activity. This theory creates an organic cause for the movement with constant off-balance.
Satoshi's fan page

Festungsfront Oder-Warthe-Bogen

MRU
Międzyrzecki Rejon Umocniony - MRU
From Wikipedia:
The Festungsfront Oder-Warthe-Bogen (Fortified Front Oder-Warthe-Bogen), also called the Festung im Oder-Warthe-Bogen or Ostwall (East Wall), and in Polish the Międzyrzecki Rejon Umocniony (Międzyrzecz Fortification Region), was a fortified military defence line of Nazi Germany between the Oder and Warta rivers. Built in 1934–38, it was the most technologically advanced fortification system of Nazi Germany, and remains one of the largest and the most interesting systems of this type in the world today. It consists of around 100 concrete defence structures partially interconnected by a network of underground tunnels. Some of the forts and tunnels are available for visiting.

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Climbing on Diablak


Diablak - Babia Góra [ˈbabja ˈɡura] (in Polish), or Babia hora (in Slovak), literally Old Wives' or Witches' Mountain, is a massif situated on the border between Poland and Slovakia in the Western Beskidy Mountains. The name is also applied to the culmination of the massif, Diablak ("Devil's Peak"), which is also the highest peak of this part of the Carpathian Mountains, at 1,725 metres (5,659 ft) above sea level.

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Ruins of the church in Trzęsacz

From Wikipedia: The Church in Trzęsacz refers to a series of three churches built in Trzęsacz, Poland. The first, constructed of wood, was reportedly built in 1124; the second one, made of bricks, around 1270; and finally the third one, sometime in the late 14th or early 15th century. At that time, it was located almost two kilometers from the sea (according to many sources, 1800 meters). Furthermore, north of Trzęsacz there was another village, which had completely been taken over by water. Originally, the church was Roman Catholic, but in the early 16th century, after the Reformation, it became Protestant. According to some chronicles, it was the third Christian temple in Pomerania.

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